Study Compares Pigs fed GMO’s vs. Non-GMO feed.

We recently found a study that compares feeding pigs GMO feed and Non-GMO feed.

This study relates both to the pigs to themselves and to us.  Not only do people consume pigs, they are also eating these untested GMO crops.  Pigs and humans have a very similar digestive tract.  So if this is happening to pigs, what is happening to the people who eat these foods?  Also consider that pigs mature and reproduce in just one year, and we have the potential to look at what our future may hold (at least for those who eat processed foods).

Pigs fed a GMO diet had a 25% larger uterus than pigs fed non-GMO feed.  They also had “inflammation of the stomach and small intestine, stomach ulcers, a thinning of intestinal walls and an increase in haemorrhagic bowel disease, where a pig can rapidly “bleed-out” from their bowel and die.”  In addition they found that “males were more strongly affected. While female pigs were 2.2 times more likely to get severe stomach inflammation when on the GM diet, males were 4 times more likely. These findings are both biologically significant and statistically significant.”  In addition there was “reduced ability to conceive and higher rates of miscarriage in piggeries where sows were fed a GM diet, and a reduction in the number of piglets born.”

Interestingly Autism is often marked by digestive issues and males are more likely than females to become autistic.  With the health problems Americans face today, and so few truly scientific available (unbiased studies not done by companies that stand to make money of them), it’s hard to know what is the cause of our many health problems.

Both the complete summary and the full report are available to view.

Unless you want you and your family to participate in the biggest scientific study of all time, I would say it’s best to error on the side of caution and keep your food as clean and natural as you can.  Part of that is making sure to limit your exposure to GMO foods.

We’re proud to offer GMO-free pork and eggs.  Visit our website to learn more about how we raise our animals.